The Ultimate Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Study Resource

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Scientific research has unearthed a number of physiological and biochemical abnormalities found in individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

Many of these factors such as micronutrient deficiencies(Co-Enzyme Q10, Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Zinc etc) have been proven to correlate to the symptoms such as chronic fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, immune system dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuro-cognitive symptoms typically seen in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Some of the other factors which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CFS/ME include hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, hypocortisolism, micro-nutrient deficiencies, inflammatory/oxidative stress and nitrosative disorders, mitochondrial dysfunction, viral infections, heavy metal toxicity such as mercury and much more.

I have created this resource with a collection of some of my favorite studies and scientific research on the possible pathogenesis of CFS/ME, which may hopefully be of help to other individuals suffering from this debilitating condition.

I will continue to keep this resource updated with current studies and research as applicable.  If anyone has any good research papers on CFS/ME, please share them via the comment section below and we will add them to the list.

Mitochondrial Dysfunction & Energy Metabolism

Mitochondrial Dysfunction & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

 

 

 

1. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is related to fatigue, autonomic and neurocognitive symptoms and is another risk factor explaining the early mortality in ME/CFS due to cardiovascular disorder.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20010505

2. Does Oral Coenzyme Q10 Plus NADH Supplementation Improve Fatigue and Biochemical Parameters in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4346380/

3. Chronic fatigue syndrome and mitochondrial dysfunction

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2680051/

4. Mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathophysiology of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22837795

5. Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in the treatment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) – a clinical audit.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23236553

6. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome explained by activated immuno-inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24557875

Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Axis Dysregulation, Hypo-Cortisolism & Neuro-Endocrinology

Hypo-cortisol, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, chronic fatigue syndrome

 

 

 

 

1. The role of hypocortisolism in chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24636516

2. Hypocortisolism: An Evidence-based Review

http://www.mmimedicine.com/assets/pdf/IntResources1IMCJ_10_4_p26-33_Hypocortisolism_3.pdf

3. A Review of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2013/784520/

4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21946893

5. Evidence for and pathophysiologic implications of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9629295

6. The HPA axis and the genesis of chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15036250

7. The neuroendocrinology of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11722149

Nutrient Deficiencies

micronutrient deficiencies chronic fatigue syndrome

 

 

 

 

1. Increased concentrations of homocysteine in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. (Vitamin B12 Deficiency)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9310111

2. Lower serum zinc in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): relationships to immune dysfunctions and relevance for the oxidative stress status in CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16338007

3. Vitamin B status in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10450194

4. Multivitamin mineral supplementation in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907507/

5. Association between vitamin D status and markers of vascular health in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME)

http://www.meresearch.org.uk/our-research/completed-studies/vitd-status-and-vascular-health/

6. In chronic fatigue syndrome, the decreased levels of omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids are related to lowered serum zinc and defects in T cell activation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16380690

Oxidative Stress, Anti-oxidants & Glutathione

Oxidative Stress & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME

 

 

 

 

1. Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22281935

2. Oxidative stress levels are raised in chronic fatigue syndrome and are associated with clinical symptoms.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16085177

3. Chronic fatigue syndrome: oxidative stress and dietary modifications.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11703165

Inflammation

Inflammation & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

 

 

 

1. Neuroinflammation in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: An ¹¹C-(R)-PK11195 PET Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24665088

2. Gut inflammation in chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20939923

3. Normalization of leaky gut in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is accompanied by a clinical improvement: effects of age, duration of illness and the translocation of LPS from gram-negative bacteria.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19112401

4. Why myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may kill you: disorders in the inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways may explain cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20038921

Alternative Therapy & Potential Treatments

Alternative Therapy & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Study

 

 

 

 

1. Possible use of repeated cold stress for reducing fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome: a hypothesis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2164952/

2. A pilot study employing Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19078357

3. Therapeutic effects of oral NADH on the symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. (Prof. George Birkmayer NADH – Available from Amazon at – Prof. George Birkmayer NADH – Rapid Energy (60 tablets, 20 mg NADH)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10071523

4. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of a probiotic in emotional symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664325/

5. Green tea extract and catechin ameliorate chronic fatigue-induced oxidative stress in mice.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15857209

6. The use of D-ribose in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17109576

The information in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and should not be used to diagnose, cure or treat any disease, implied or otherwise.

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